2 Notes

The Telegram Building

The Portland Telegram Building formerly served as the headquarters of The Portland Telegram, a now-defunct local newspaper founded in 1877 by Henry L. Pittock. The red brick and terra-cotta structure culminates in a colonial-style clock tower.

The Architectural Heritage Center has a case study and more photos here.

I believe there was a bank on the ground floor as recent as a couple years ago but is now vacant? Oh, and sorry for the blurry “then” pic.

1 Notes

JFK visits Milwaukie (Taken with Instagram at Main Street Soda Fountain)

JFK visits Milwaukie (Taken with Instagram at Main Street Soda Fountain)

Notes

Then (1940s) and now. You can see the tip of a car in the then pic. (Taken with instagram)

Then (1940s) and now. You can see the tip of a car in the then pic. (Taken with instagram)

2 Notes

(The original!) Trader Vic’s then and now

Once located on the corner of Broadway and Stark, Trader Vic’s was the tiki hangout in Portland from 1959 to the mid-1990s. 

Check out more photos here

"Then" photo courtesy of University of Oregon’s Digital Archives

1 Notes

Oregon City, 7th and Main. 
The “then” shot is a screen cap from a Route 66 episode filmed in Oregon City in the early 60s. 
Watch part one here. It’s amazing. 

Oregon City, 7th and Main. 

The “then” shot is a screen cap from a Route 66 episode filmed in Oregon City in the early 60s. 

Watch part one here. It’s amazing. 

Notes

Phoenix Drugs building in Foster-Powell

Grabbed these great images from Emerick Architects Facebook page

Unlike some of the buildings posted here, this one in the Foster-Powell (FoPo) neighborhood, (6615 S.E. Foster), is getting some retrofittin’ lovin’. 

Though it’s been put on Portland’s unsafe list (you can see the ubiquitous “U” in the above photo), Emerick is, according to its Facebook page, working on restoring the building with help from PDC’s DOS program

If you’re on Facebook, here’s a page that’s helping promote the building. 

Revitalizing neighborhoods + historic renovation = win!

Notes

Another shot of the Studio Building, aka, “New Fave Building in PDX.” (Taken with instagram)
Not a then/now shot and accidentally uploaded, but what the heck - it’s such an amazing building I’ll keep it posted. 

Another shot of the Studio Building, aka, “New Fave Building in PDX.” (Taken with instagram)

Not a then/now shot and accidentally uploaded, but what the heck - it’s such an amazing building I’ll keep it posted. 

Notes

The “now” shot was taken during Dan Haneckow’s most excellent walking tour of Portland’s waterfront (where only 20% of the cast iron buildings still exist). 
Here’s more about the building from Dan’s blog, Cafe Unknown. 
Here’s more on the surrounding neighborhood from my other blog, Lost Oregon. 

The “now” shot was taken during Dan Haneckow’s most excellent walking tour of Portland’s waterfront (where only 20% of the cast iron buildings still exist). 

Here’s more about the building from Dan’s blog, Cafe Unknown

Here’s more on the surrounding neighborhood from my other blog, Lost Oregon. 

2 Notes

Hotel Cornelius then (built in 1908) and now. 
It’s currently in disrepair and has been labeled unsafe by the city of Portland, while its striking mansard roof goes virtually unnoticed today to passersby. 
According to Wikipedia, the 

ground-floor wood storefront was once a “Ladies Reception Hall” and an featured an opulent basement cafe. Ornate wood paneling and trim was included throughout the building.

In 2008, there was talk to retrofit it into a boutique hotel. 
It now sits in sad disrepair. 

Hotel Cornelius then (built in 1908) and now. 

It’s currently in disrepair and has been labeled unsafe by the city of Portland, while its striking mansard roof goes virtually unnoticed today to passersby. 

According to Wikipedia, the 

ground-floor wood storefront was once a “Ladies Reception Hall” and an featured an opulent basement cafe. Ornate wood paneling and trim was included throughout the building.

In 2008, there was talk to retrofit it into a boutique hotel. 

It now sits in sad disrepair. 

2 Notes

Then (Chown Hardware in 1967) and now (Kells).
Glisan’s Building, built in 1889. Here’s more on this wonderful cast iron building. 

Then (Chown Hardware in 1967) and now (Kells).

Glisan’s Building, built in 1889. Here’s more on this wonderful cast iron building